Life is Delicious
Proximity to power deludes some into believing they wield it.
Frank Underwood (via tattoosandtravels)
istayfitter:

Tri swimmers

istayfitter:

Tri swimmers

fuckyeahfloridastate:

All headlines should read: NOLES WIN CHAMPIONSHIP, TALLAHASSEE TRANSFORMS INTO CRYSTAL PALACE

fuckyeahfloridastate:

All headlines should read: NOLES WIN CHAMPIONSHIP, TALLAHASSEE TRANSFORMS INTO CRYSTAL PALACE

themeparkzach:

Old Fort Wilderness Logo.

themeparkzach:

Old Fort Wilderness Logo.

posterityobscured:

Rock Garden panorama, taken on FSU’s main campus

posterityobscured:

Rock Garden panorama, taken on FSU’s main campus

gameraboy:

Gridlock at Autopia, 1965! It’s what you expect when the cars are powered by “Richfield Boron Gasoline”. From the 1965 Disneyland Tencennial Insert, via Vintage Disneyland Tickets. More vintage Disney.

adambatchelor:

I finished reading Born to Run by Christopher McDougall the other day and it’s one of the greatest books i’ve ever read, if you want to read about running I can’t recommend it enough. 
In Born to Run, McDougall tracks down members of the reclusive Tarahumara Indian tribe in the Mexican Copper Canyons. After being repeatedly injured as a runner himself, McDougall marvels at the tribe’s ability to run ultra distances (over 26.2 miles, commonly 100 miles or more) at incredible speeds, without getting the routine injuries of most American runners. The book has received attention in the sporting world for McDougall’s description of how he overcame injuries by modeling his running after the Tarahumara.[3]He asserts that modern cushioned running shoes are a major cause of running injury, pointing to the thin sandals called huaraches worn by Tarahumara runners, and the explosion of running-related injuries since the introduction of modern running shoes in 1972.
Alongside his research into the Tarahumara, McDougall delves into why the human species, unique among other primates, has developed traits for endurance running. He promotes the endurance running hypothesis, arguing that humans left the forests and moved to the savannas by developing the ability to run long distances in order to literally run down prey.
McDougall also has received critical praise for his rich story-telling and the many quirky characters portrayed in the book, including not only the Tarahumara but exceptional Western runners who share the Tarahumara spirit of running for enjoyment and spiritual experience. The book was on the New York Times Best Seller List for more than four months, although the otherwise positively inclined book critic Dan Zak, writer of the Style section of the Washington Post thought it contained extraneous efforts to be “gonzo and overly clever.”

adambatchelor:

I finished reading Born to Run by Christopher McDougall the other day and it’s one of the greatest books i’ve ever read, if you want to read about running I can’t recommend it enough. 

In Born to Run, McDougall tracks down members of the reclusive Tarahumara Indian tribe in the Mexican Copper Canyons. After being repeatedly injured as a runner himself, McDougall marvels at the tribe’s ability to run ultra distances (over 26.2 miles, commonly 100 miles or more) at incredible speeds, without getting the routine injuries of most American runners. The book has received attention in the sporting world for McDougall’s description of how he overcame injuries by modeling his running after the Tarahumara.[3]He asserts that modern cushioned running shoes are a major cause of running injury, pointing to the thin sandals called huaraches worn by Tarahumara runners, and the explosion of running-related injuries since the introduction of modern running shoes in 1972.

Alongside his research into the Tarahumara, McDougall delves into why the human species, unique among other primates, has developed traits for endurance running. He promotes the endurance running hypothesis, arguing that humans left the forests and moved to the savannas by developing the ability to run long distances in order to literally run down prey.

McDougall also has received critical praise for his rich story-telling and the many quirky characters portrayed in the book, including not only the Tarahumara but exceptional Western runners who share the Tarahumara spirit of running for enjoyment and spiritual experience. The book was on the New York Times Best Seller List for more than four months, although the otherwise positively inclined book critic Dan Zak, writer of the Style section of the Washington Post thought it contained extraneous efforts to be “gonzo and overly clever.”

circusriot:

Finally, they arrived! Copper Canyon Ultra Marathon Posters. #ccum

circusriot:

Finally, they arrived! Copper Canyon Ultra Marathon Posters. #ccum

indianajonesadventure:

Installation of the first ship in Maelstrom (then known as SeaVenture) at the Norway Pavilion, EPCOT Center.

indianajonesadventure:

Installation of the first ship in Maelstrom (then known as SeaVenture) at the Norway Pavilion, EPCOT Center.

vintagedisneyparks:

  1. He’s friendly and fun (and probably weighs a ton). A mouse: his friend, the chains: his foe. No longer part of the greatest show.
  2. It doesn’t cost much, so no need to stop her. To find out your future, just drop in some copper.
  3. This shop doesn’t share its name with 33…